Monday, 10 December 2012 13:46

Trailblazing Baptist woman turns 100

Virginia Connally, Abilene's first woman physician, is honored in days of events celebrating her Baptist identity, service and 100th birthday.

Published in People

WASHINGTON— High school juniors and seniors can win up to $2,000 for college in the 2013 Religious Liberty Essay Scholarship Contest sponsored by the Religious Liberty Council of the Baptist Joint Committee. Essays must examine religious diversity in America and evaluate the claim that the United States was founded as a “Christian nation.”

For the 8th annual contest, the scholarship money doubled for the top two prizes. Grand prize is $2,000 and airfare and lodging for two to Washington, D.C. Second prize is $1,000, and third prize is $250.

High school students in the graduating classes of 2013 and 2014 can enter by writing an essay addressing the following topic:

The United States of America was religiously diverse at its founding. Its population included numerous Protestant groups, small Catholic and Jewish populations, those who practiced traditional Native American religions as well as those who practiced African religions. The United States has become even more religiously diverse, yet Christianity has remained the majority faith tradition since the country’s beginnings. Today, some Americans assert that the country was founded as a “Christian nation” while others contend that statement is a myth. Using the Constitution and writings of the Founders, research and evaluate the claim that the United States was founded as a “Christian nation.” Include a discussion of the current implications for religious freedom for all people in a democratic country in which the majority rules in elections and ballot initiatives.

Essays must be between 800-1,200 words, and they must be mailed – along with registration forms – and postmarked by March 1, 2013, to be eligible. Contest forms and details are available online at www.BJConline.org/contest.

Winners will be announced in the summer of 2013, and the grand prize winner will be recognized at the BJC board meeting in Washington, D.C., in October 2013.

Essays will be judged on the depth of their content, the mastery of the topic, and the skill with which they are written. Students should develop a point of view on the issue and demonstrate critical thinking, using appropriate examples, reasons and other evidence to support their position.

Visit www.BJConline.org/contest for complete contest rules. If you have questions, contact Cherilyn Crowe at 202-544-4226 or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

 

The Baptist Joint Committee is a 76-year-old, Washington, D.C.-based religious liberty organization that works to defend and extend God-given religious liberty for all, bringing a uniquely Baptist witness to the principle that religion must be freely exercised, neither advanced nor inhibited by government.

Published in Baptist News Wire
Wednesday, 17 October 2012 00:00

Fan or foe, children's sermon here to stay

Critics say the sermons aren't really sermons and aren't really for kids; supporters say they are a way to include children in worship.

Published in People
Friday, 07 September 2012 16:00

Moderate Baptists face generation gap

As the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship enters its third decade, growing numbers of second-generation CBF supporters are eager for opportunties to serve.

Published in Organizations

BOILING SPRINGS, N.C.— Crossroads Worldwide Summer Camp 2012 began its seventeenth consecutive year at Gardner-Webb University this week. For five weeks, the ministry will immerse more than 3,400 youth campers in a variety of worship experiences focused on this year’s theme, “The Dwelling Place.” Nightly worship services, held Monday – Thursday at 7 p.m. through July 26, are open to the community.

Published in Baptist News Wire
Thursday, 03 November 2011 11:28

Out of the mouths of babes

I have a secret fear of children’s sermons, largely because, even though you are leading the time, you really have no control over the situation at all.

Published in Talk With the Preacher
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